Ragged February Flowers

FebruaryFlowers9
FebruaryFlowers3
FebruaryFlowers8
FebruaryFlowers2

FebruaryFlowers4
FebruaryFlowers6

FebruaryFlowers10

FebruaryFlowers5After a bit of warmer weather a few days ago, I noticed some of the tiny seed heads from last year had managed to make their way up through the snow for some air. I think it will be a while before any more of them show their ragged little heads; we are back to winter and that snow is still thick over the earth. I like seeing how they change over the seasons so I took a few photographs this morning as we shivered together in the wind. Happily, they are still filled with little seeds of hope.

© Karen McRae, 2014

September Songs 2

SeptemberSong6

SeptemberSong9

SeptemberSong4

SeptemberSong_the-Rains

SeptemberSong5Photographs of the seedheads of Lactuca Canadensis (which sounds slightly more elegant than Canada lettuce). These wild plants are not particularly beautiful at first glance, but as with many things, there is often beauty to be found in the details.

SeptemberSong7One of these things is not like the others – a layer of raindrops has been added to one image – at this moment I can hear the last day of summer being washed away by the autumn rains.

© Karen McRae, 2013

Just Play

That’s what summer is for, isn’t it?
I am refusing to notice (for now) that some of the trees are already changing colour.

Layersofsummer2

Layersofsummer4

Layersofsummer1[Pixie cup lichen and layers of summer]

© Karen McRae, 2013

This Side of Winter

LastYearsBlooms

LastYearsBlooms2

LastYearsBlooms4These are the last of the little seedheads from my garden that I have been documenting through the seasons. Somehow a few of them survived the weight of winter relatively intact. I had left them in the garden so I could photograph them on this side of winter.

LastYearsBlooms11

LastYearsBlooms10

LastYearsBlooms7These little remnants of flowers have been through many transitions over the last few months. They have been frosted, covered in freezing rain, and buried under snow.
I have photographed them in different light where they have taken on the colours of what is around them. I haven’t edited the photographs much at all, the tones you see in each set are from the surrounding growth .

You can see the beginning of the series here, here, here, and here.

LastYearsBlooms5

LastYearsBlooms6

LastYearsBlooms12

© Karen McRae, 2013

looking for spring and finding a little

It seems appropriate that the first buds to open in spring are little catkins dressed in fur coats. You can see why they still might need winter coats around here – the days are still frosted at the edges.

FrostedPussyWillows5

SparklingSpringMorning2

FrostedPussyWillows3

SparklingSpringMorning5

SparklingSpringMorning4

SparklingSpringMorning1

FrostedPussyWillows6

FrostedPussyWillows8

FrostedPussyWillows4 I came across these pussy willows quite by accident this morning – something told me to walk just a little further, and look just a little more carefully. They are just coming to life.

© Karen McRae, 2013

Feathered and Frosted

Cardinal

Luminous5

FrostedMarchMorning6

FrostedMarchMorning2

FrostedMarchMorning5

It is hard to believe Spring is just a few days away (photographs from early this morning). It seems likely the next photographs posted here will be laden with fresh snow … the clouds are moving in – Winter is not through with us.

© Karen McRae, 2013

By Degrees

LateWinter1LateWinter5FringedFlowers2We are creeping ever so slowly out of winter and these pale robin’s egg blue tones seemed to have a little whisper of spring in them, (which I am craving today!).

(Water reflections of trees and frosted winter flowers)
© Karen McRae, 2013