A Residual Winter Breath

Our temporary “summer” has been replaced by more normal seasonal temperatures.
A windy breath of -10° c overnight drove the waves and spray up on to the sloped shore of this bay resulting in a strange and magical landscape when I came upon it yesterday. Not that long ago the ice fishing huts resided in this wide bay.


The perfectly ice-upholstered and fringed rocks along the shore.




Surreal spaces…



Although this place is quite removed from the city and looks idyllic and peaceful there is a strange juxtaposition of bird song and intermittent rapid gunfire from the nearby rifle range. It all feels rather surreal as I wade through the water in high rubber boots; a strange shore bird among chandelier skirted trees.



Shirley’s Bay, Ottawa River

All images © Karen McRae

100 thoughts on “A Residual Winter Breath

      1. I agree, really well written. And what a bizarre set if ice sculptures, and you in rubber boots just to get the shot – totally worth the effort. These are such interesting photos.

  1. Absolutely great photos. I knew you liked to go out in the morning but never quite pictured you in hip -boots wading around. You really love your work to be so diligent to get the shots you know will be great. Must have been windy to blow all that mist on the rocks and trees. Thank you once more for working so hard and sharing the results of your efforts.

  2. These are extraordinary images beautifully composed. I have just never seen ice formations of this kind – I assume it is something to do with a sudden, severe drop in temperature. I like the council of druids or penitents or whatever they are in #8, and the reflections are magical. But it’s invidious choosing between them.

  3. I can only use the word Awesome Karen… I tried not to but I couldn’t help myself… !! Your weather is kind to photographers! makes me want minus 10 winds…
    but only for a moment!
    Goodness knows how you’ll manage when summer arrives you are loving this winter photography so much ;)

  4. I called myself a nature photographer before I viewed your magnificent images. Now I call myself a student. Thank you!

  5. Wow Karen! Wow wow wow – you have your very own ice-sculpture garden!… But I must say a few words too :) And the “perfectly ice-upholstered and fringed rocks” – wow! Great captures of this surreal beauty!

  6. Those structures, especially the ‘upholstered’ rocks are so unusual! Those rocks are quite something though. I really like the one of all the branches reflected in the water. And I am compelled to ask, do you write too? Or do you want to? You have an easy and beautiful way with words.

  7. It’s hard to talk when the stunning photos just took my breath away. Unbelievably beautiful formations. I am so lucky you are there taking photos and I am able to enjoy them so often. :D

  8. Your wonderful magical frozen sculptures will see me through the next hot Australian summer – if we ever get one again that is!

  9. That first image showing the ‘chandeier skirted rocks’ brought to mind the most likely reason how chandeliers were thought of and designed. I bet it was someone who had been to this place, in an earlier time, of course! Lovely photos.

  10. Look at winter just trying to cling on. It’s sad to see it go but I cannot wait to see what you start shooting now that greener times are just around the corner.

  11. Amazing! All I can say is i really miss the flower pictures you always take and the trees :( I do love this pictures, but I can’t help but say this. You are an amazing photographer… sometimes when I am reading between the pictures, I am so in a hurry to look at the second picture that I ignore the writing!

    As much as I love your site, I hope you can follow me back (:
    Maria
    x

  12. What a nice comment from ‘Flake of Glass’, Karen, and he puts into few words what I feel too, when I view your work! These are stunning ice formations, captured beautifully. I have never seen anything like them – ever!

    Cheers

    John

  13. I live on a lake in Nova Scotia and get these ice formations often but it’s often hard to get just the right light to capture them to their best advantage. You have managed to capture their magic – well done!!!

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